Posts Tagged ‘Precious Ramotswe’

There is no use trying to act like this is news to anyone.  You have already no doubt heard that Clovis Andersen, the American author of The Principles of Private Detection, the veritable bible of Precious Ramotswe, visited Botswana and stayed at the President Hotel in Gaborone.  He not only visited the No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency, but also collaborated with Mma Ramotswe on a very important case.  All the details are in Alexander McCall Smith’s thirteenth book in The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Series, very smartly titled The Limpopo Academy Of Private Detection.

I wish I could report that Grace Makutsi and her talking shoes, now that she is married to milk toast Phuti Radiphuti, have withdrawn from detective work leaving Mma Ramotswe in peace; but I can not.  I don’t want to be mean about this; but mark my words, I see a sanitarium visit in the future of the new Mma Radiphuti.

Charlie, worthless failed apprentice of Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni at the Tlokweng Road Speedy Motors, proves himself exceedingly ingenious and useful.  I will tell no more so the details are fresh when you read them.  I, for one, commend him.  Charles Marlin


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More news of Precious Ramotswe from Alexander McCall Smith in the twelfth book in The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency Series.  This time it is The Saturday Big Tent Wedding Party; yes, Grace Makutsi finally marries Phuti Radiphuti.  Far be it from me to pass on stories or gossip about Grace, so I will not mention any details about her obsession with shoes, her abuse of Precious’ kind and gentle personality, or her unhealthy dislike of Violet Sephotho.

Precious is called to a difficult case involving cruelty to cattle which she is unable to solve but is able to resolve in a traditional Botswana way.  While on the case, Precious brings new purpose to the life of Charlie, the uncertified mechanical assistant at the Tlokweng Road Speedy Motors, although it is far too soon to say Charlie is a changed person.

The really great news is that something precious to Precious is returned to her in far better shape than when she lost it.  I will not be like Grace and immediately speculate as to when it will again list to the driver’s side.

The wedding of you know who to you know whom is over but I fear it will not bring relief to the detective agency.  I have a feeling that who is not going to quit her job.  I may write a letter to the author.  Charles Marlin

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Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni, proprietor of Tlokweng Road Speedy Motors, has forced Mma Precious Ramotswe, my friend and his wife, to give up her beloved old van for a larger, white van.  I know she still mourns the loss of her old van but she knows that things are always changing at the No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency and she must look forward with good cheer.  The daughter of Obed Ramotswe has the bedrock virtues and courage of old Botswana, so she resolutely works to help friends and strangers alike.

Alexander McCall Smith in his latest report on Mma Ramotswe The Double Comfort Safari Club finds  things at home peaceful but abuzz at the agency.  Mma Makutsi turns to her boss for help with a major personal crisis.  Marital disaffection brings friends to the agency for help.  A stranger has a very big problem with the tramp Violet Sephotho which Precious solves much to the delight of her secretary.  An unusual inquiry from America sends Precious and her secretary on a trip north to safari country where Precious comes face to face with a lion in the night.

You’ll want to get all the details by reading the new report.  It is as always a delight.  I want to say right now so you can attest to my saying it first.  Before Mma Makutsi and Phuti Radiphuti are married and settled in, Violet Sephotho will come to the No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency for help which will turn into another crisis for Mma Makutsi.  As you know, the animosity between those two is long standing.  And still Precious will not fire her.  Mark my words.

I hope you like the snapshot of the cattle Precious inherited from her father Obed before she was obliged to sell them.  The cattle were his profession and honor, and for her they represent the good of old Botswana.  Charles Marlin

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