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Posts Tagged ‘Charles Marlin’

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First Photograph, left to right: Jamie Lafever, Trenton Moulin, and Mike Vereb. Mike and Sally Vereb hosted the September 17th meeting of the Clarion County Community Foundation Board of Directors at Lincoln Hall, a historic performance space above the Foxburg Free Library. Sally made pizzas and chocolate chip cookies in the kitchen of the Button House and brought them across the street to our delight. The Board has never been treated so well or met in so charming a space.

Second Photograph, left to right: Barry McCauliff, Bill Kaufman, Janice Horn, and Hal Wassink. Following our meeting we toured the Button House, a Depression Era home of double plank construction Mike and Sally have restored and decorated in period furnishings to display some of Sally’s vast collection of buttons.

Third Photograph, left to right: Jamie Lafever, Clara Belloit, Jerry Belloit, and Sally Vereb. Sally gave us a brief introduction and then we wandered throughout the house. The buttons decorate every room and are organized by time, fashion, material, and subject matter.

Fourth Photograph, altogether: Charles Marlin and Sally Vereb. We asked lots of questions and had an aw-shucks time. It would be difficult not to enjoy a tour of the Button House which Sally offers during the summer months. Call her at (724) 659-0180 or do the email thing at buttons@thebuttonhouse.com

Fifth Photograph: Depression Era aprons at the Button House. The tours are free; but there is a “Donations Appreciated” bowl in the living room. You can skip the bowl if you bring Sally a bag of buttons; or as I discovered, Sally has a second weakness for Depression-Style aprons. Find her a good one, and bring it along.

Please don’t expect Sally to make pizzas for you as she only does that for very “special” occasions. Around the corner from the Button House is the Foxburg Pizza Place, the Allegheny Grille, Foxburg Wine Cellars, and Divani Chocolatier (and ice cream parlor). You will not leave Foxburg hungry. Charles Marlin

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Punxsutawney Area Community Foundation is alive and now serving their community as of Thursday, June 5th, when the foundation president, Katie Laska, signed the affiliate agreement with Bridge Builders Community Foundations.  Bridge Builders Trustee President, Charles Marlin, signed for Bridge Builders, and foundation vice president, Michele Neal, witnessed the signing along with Bridge Builders’ Executive Director, Trenton Moulin, and Administrative Assistant, Lauren Lupinacci.  The signing was topped off with pizza at Laska’s Pizza.

To welcome its new neighbor, the Clarion County Community Foundation authorized an immediate transfer of $1,000. to the PACF Unrestricted Grants Endowment, so only minutes old the foundation is working for the community.  In the weeks, months, and years ahead, all of the community will learn the services and benefits of having a locally controlled and locally sensitive community foundation.  By affiliating with Bridge Builders, the community foundation in turn gains the stability of professional administration and strength in size.

PACF joins Clarion County CF, Forest County CF, and Venango Area CF, and together they send trustees who serve on the Board of Trustees of BBCF.  Each community controls its own affiliate, and the affiliates together control the umbrella administration for all the affiliates.  BBCF is headquartered in the National Transit Annex, 206 Seneca Street, Oil City PA 16301.  The phone is (814) 677-8687.

Although new, the PACF has a history.  Many community citizens have worked and agitated for a community foundation, some for a long time and others are new to the cause.  Pictures, names, and stories should be collected so that remembering the founders is always honored.  One of the wonderful services a community foundation provides is a means for remembrance and memorial.  The founders are worthy of the community’s thanks and honor.
Photographed at the signing are, left to right, Charles Marlin, Michele Neal, and Trenton Moulin.  Charles Marlin

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The Board of Directors of the Clarion County Community Foundation held its Annual Meeting on March 20th, our sixth since or founding 13 March 2007.  As part of our anniversary we placed a flower on the graves of those who are honored by memorial funds and those who have established a fund.

We elected to second terms of two years the officers of the Board: President Bill Kaufman, Vice President Charles Marlin, Treasurer Jerry Belloit, and Secretary Clara Belloit.  Our current Trustees on the Board of Bridge Builders Community Foundations are serving terms that expire 13 March 2015.  We elected the 13 March 2016 class of directors: Janice Horn, Jamie Lefever, Andy Montana, and Sally Vereb.

We hope to recruit three additional members to the Board; and extend an invitation to anyone interested in the work of the community foundation to contact our president, Bill Kaufman at (814) 229-8622.  Two members, Nancy Ambrose and Bill Rupert, retired at the end of their terms, and shall be missed.  Nancy Ambrose was a Founding Director of CCCF.

Following the election, the Board took three actions which must now be given final approval by the BBCF Trustees.  First, we changed the CCCF Bylaws to eliminate the restriction on the number of terms a Director may serve if elected; and to allow officers of the Board to serve two consecutive terms of two years.

Second, we approved the Adam Weeter Memorial Scholarship Fund for Keystone High School Seniors.  It will be a $2,000. scholarship, beginning this year.

Third, we approved a joint grant to the Clarion Y, a satellite of the Oil City Y, of $250 from CCCF, to be added to $750 from the Venango Area Community Foundation.  Charles Marlin

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John Deemer, Oil City businessman and friend of Venango Area Community Foundation and Bridge Builders Community Foundations, created and donated the beautiful table the BBCF Trustees used for the first time May 1st.  The table is 4’x10′, with a blond oak base and Formica top.

 

The table outshined the Trustees, and we thank him for his gift.  The Trustees are Joseph Keebler, Susan Williams, and Jason Woolcock for VACF; Lynn McCaslin and Norman Wimer for Forest County Community Foundation; Jerry Belloit, Bill Kaufman, and Charles Marlin for Clarion County Community Foundation; and Trent Moulin, Executive Director of BBCF.

If you are looking for me in the pictures, I am the good-looking one.  Charles Marlin

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The Clarion County Community Foundation held its fifth annual meeting March 22, 2012, to conduct regular business and elect officers for coming terms.  The 13 March 2015 class of directors elected for three-year terms are Tracy Becker -first term, William Hearst -second term, Bill Kaufman -first term, and Jack Troese -first term.

For CCCF trustees on the Bridge Builders Community Foundations Board of Trustees we elected Jerry Belloit -second term, Bill Kaufman -first term, and Charles Marlin -second term.

Officers for CCCF elected for one-year terms are President Bill Kaufman –first term, Vice President Charles Marlin -first term, Treasurer Jerry Belloit -first term, and Secretary Clara Belloit -first term.

We have three openings on the CCCF Board of Directors, and we would welcome interest from volunteers who may wish to serve on the Board.  For more information about what is involved, please contact our new board president, Bill Kaufman at whkaufman@gmail.com or his cell number (814) 229-8622.  Charles Marlin

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A community can die for the lack of a helping hand; however, it can survive hard times if resources are laid aside to maintain continuity.  You can help a community long into the future by supporting an endowed trust fund held by your local community foundation.  Through good times and bad, a community endowed trust fund ensures the community will not dry up and blow in the wind.

Asking The Big Question

An endowed trust fund asks every citizen, not just the obviously prosperous community leaders, “Will you consider adding a bequest in your will naming your community fund?”  The question is simple, polite, and appropriate when presented to everyone through community promotion.

Unifying The Community

Every community has several charitable needs such as the volunteer fire company, local ambulance service, community park, community center, public library, school athletics, and local food bank.  A community endowed trust fund asks you to give to support all of these without disrupting long-standing loyalties to individual charities.  It is a unique opportunity to add to the whole community.

Building A Reserve

Holding to a budget is a good thing but it does not protect from exceptionally long events such as a decline in population.  Like every individual, a community needs to build a reserve against rough times.  Timber, gas, coal, farming, and manufacturing will rise or fall eventually, but community needs remain.  A contingency fund can only be used once; it is not a long-term resource.

Ensuring Integrity

Placing an endowed trust fund with a community foundation means it will never leave the community with a bank merger, it will never become the private fund of one official or click, it will always be professionally managed, its records remain open to any citizen, and its safety is guarded by a community board, a local fund committee, and state supervision.

Avoiding Crisis Depletion

When faced with a desperate need for immediate funds, a local council or board will always turn to the easiest source, and the easiest source is  funds under their authority.  The problem is no trust account is protected from a raid during a crisis unless it has legally independent trustees protecting it as an endowment.  Nobody can ever raid a community foundation endowed trust fund–those endowments are held in perpetuity.

Expecting The Unexpected

New problems and charitable needs arise as some familiar needs receded.  No one can predict what future needs will be; but you can prepare your community by supporting a fund open to appeals based on contemporary needs.

Stimulating Good Deeds

When you see within your community the good work resulting from an endowed trust fund, you are often stimulated in other ways to reach out and help.  You see that good deeds are noticed and respected by your community.  You feel pride in being where you are.

Teaching By Example

Younger siblings, children, and grandchildren know your values by your actions.  They learn responsibilities and loyalties by modeling after you.  Your giving now can live on in memory and influence way beyond your lifetime.

Levelling The Giving

Giving to one fund means strength is gained through the number of participants rather than individual amounts.  Large and small donations help in the same way by working for a common cause.  Every gift improves the whole.

Memorializing Lives

Giving in memory of a loved one or family reminds the community to not forget how those lives were lived.  The memorial is not an unread plaque or a gravestone turned into a public marker, but a continually repeated list of honor kept alive through renewal and community appreciation.

Welcoming Home

You come home to visit and look after affairs needing your attention.  When your gift and your family name are tied to the community, the years don’t matter.  You have reason to return home.  A community endowed trust fund is a welcome home sign imprinted within each person who has given and each person whose family is memorialized.  Charles Marlin

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The Trustees of Bridge Builders Community Foundations have selected Trenton E. Moulin as Executive Director and he is already on the job.  For many years Steve Kosak was our Executive Director, but he is now with PNC Bank in Oil City; and for the transition period, we had Bill Kaufman as Interim Executive Director.  Both Kosak and Kaufman pledge support and counsel to our new director.

Moulin is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, and most recently was Director of Development for the Allegheny Region Chapter of the American Red Cross.  His resume included two years as a pirate in the Caribbean, but the Trustees discounted the claim as a juvenile fantasy.

His BBCF office is 213 Seneca Street in Oil City PA 16301; and his email is trentonmoulin@gmail.com   He can be reached at the office at (814) 677-8687 or by cell at (412) 978-6841.  He will be working with the affiliate boards of the Clarion County Community Foundation, Forest County Community Foundation, and Venango Area Community Foundation.

Jeanne Best continues her work with BBCF, however under the new title of Operations Director.  With her new title, she is authorized to carry a handgun in church, campus, camp, club, and curbside.  She can be reached at (814) 677-8687 or jeanne_vacf@verizon.net

Pictured above are the officers of BBCF and the new Executive Director.  From left to right are President Susan Williams of Rouseville,  Executive Director Trent Moulin of Oil City,  Secretary Lynn McCaslin of Tionesta, Vice-President Charles Marlin of Knox, and Treasurer Jason Woolcock of Oil City.  Charles Marlin

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